Letters from David Suzuki

David Suzuki (Photo Credit - Erin Prout)

“Come in!” Though I’ve never met David Suzuki before, his voice rings through the open door, sounding as familiar as my late grandfather’s. My guess is that many other 20- to 30-year-old Canadians would feel the same way. We grew up on Suzuki’s The Nature of Things. His voice and perspective …

Continue reading

Las Guajiras de Cuba

DSC02760_1061

I’m soon en route to Cuba, the alligator shaped island only miles south of the Florida Keyes, the tiny island that could – viva! and couldn’t – coño! The place where mangos are considered tantalizing fruits and good looking guys and gals. Where art flows like water, most people are university educated, child health indicators are …

Continue reading

Congolese Refugees in Nakivale Refugee Camp: “We Can Never Go Back”

More than 400,000 farmers have been displaced from the conflict in eastern DRC (Photo - TMoyles)

For over four years, *Hanna, a 33-year old eastern Congolese woman, and her family have been living in Nakivale Refugee Settlement, a UNHCR operated camp located in southern Uganda. She and her husband live in a semi-permanent house, grow maize and beans on small, scattered plots surrounding Nakivale, and are …

Continue reading

Notes on ‘Writing What I Fear I Cannot Bear to Know’

Over the weekend, I participated in a writer’s workshop in Edmonton called ‘Researching Social Justice & Writing What I Fear I Cannot Bear to Know”. The workshop was organized by the good folks at the Centre for Global Citizenship (University of Alberta) and facilitated by two academic and creative powerhouses, …

Continue reading

‘Do You Know What ‘Misogynist’ Means?’

dal_poster

I was rattled last night by CBC’s recent reports that leaked violent, sexually explicit posts on a private Facebook group that was run by fourth year male dentistry students at Dalhousie University. It made me question my own stereotypes of ‘who is a misogynist?’ The group called themselves “Class of …

Continue reading

Eating My Way North to South in India – Part II

Spicy sauces are cooled by yogurt and coconut chutney in Tamil cooking (Photo - TMoyles)

In continuation of my culinary tales from ‘north to south’ in India… A Meal for the Desert Kings and Queens in Rajasthan It was a two-hour drive to the south from Delhi to reach Rajasthan, the land of kingdoms and camels and stretches of golden deserts. Along the way, we …

Continue reading

Eating My Way North to South in India – Part I

Tibetan dumplings, or 'momos' in northern India.

A whirlwind visit to India in late October was more than enough to tease and please the senses and stomach. Let’s just say I came for the research with woman farmers and found myself absolutely head over heels in love with India’s food culture. Forty-two meals in fourteen days: from …

Continue reading

In Need of Light – Diwali in India

Diwali, a 4-day Hindu celebration of 'light over darkness'

Last week’s lament about small farmers was saturated in angst. It wasn’t something I spun from thin air, it wasn’t from a gut emotion, spat out for the fun of the exercise. My frustration is a product of the many conversations I’ve had over the past twelve months with small …

Continue reading

Culture Shock & Stovetop Pumpkin Pie

My Ugandan attempt at Canadian Thanksgiving! (TMoyles)

Okay, I’ll admit it: I’m homesick. I’ve got a serious case of longing for Canada these days. I’m coming on two years (albeit for a brief hiatus in early 2013) in Uganda and good ole ‘culture shock’ has finally snuck up on me. These days, I am longing for the …

Continue reading

The Power of Comfort Food – Apples in the Midwest

Picking the foods that you love; that define "comfort" (Photo Credit: ATrefry)

By Amy Trefry Renowned chef Jamie Oliver recently released a new cookbook and TV series entitled “Comfort Food”. During an interview on CBC’s Q, Oliver expressed his thoughts on what makes comfort food, well, comforting. “For me, when you respond to not just cook what you want from the book, …

Continue reading

Women Who Dig – Research with Refugee Farmers

Nakivale Camp in southwestern Uganda, (Photo by Matt Darvas)

Over the past year, I’ve had the opportunity to interview women from Nicaragua, Guatemala, Canada and Uganda about their lives as farmers. The writing process has been a journey in itself; listening to the recordings of many women’s voices, over and over again, and hearing what I didn’t hear the …

Continue reading

The Chicken Feather

P1110121

It all began with the slashed crops. They lay dead in my tracks, barricading the pathway through the garden. The thick maize stalks were severed at their base. No way a cutworm could’ve sawed its way through the hardy stalks. No jagged evidence of goat teeth, either. I knelt to …

Continue reading

Compost Philosophy

P1110373

Everyone, of course, wants to eat from the garden — but not everyone is prepared to bend under the hot sun and (re)build the soil that gives birth to human sustenance. I write loosely, referring to love and community and food systems and social equality, in the same breath, the …

Continue reading

On CBC Radio – Book Project About Women in Agriculture

How are women farmers contributing to food security worldwide?

I was thrilled to be invited by CBC Radio One’s Alberta at Noon program to share more about the process of researching and writing a book about global women in agriculture. Check out my interview that was aired on May 8, 2014 at around 14 minutes into the program. Thanks …

Continue reading