Photos from the Field – Comitancillo, Guatemala

You don’t wait for chicken buses in Guatemala. You get pushed onto them, literally, and within seconds become one with a noisy chugging engine, far too many bodies pressed together on seats, and ranchara music assaulting your ears for the entire (tiresome) journey. Alas…

And then you wake up and find yourself back to where you started, your landing point. Only the body is worse for wear (suffering from a parasite, persistent cough and sunstroke), but the mind and heart teeming with too many words, ideas, feelings and far, far too much excitement to convey in any intelligble manner. Asi es mi vida! 

So I’ll let my reflections on the research experiences with women farmers and community members in Comitancillo, Guatemala resonate for the last leg of the journey – and share, instead, a few photos that capture some of the inspiring moments from the past week.

A huge and hearty thanks to AMMID’s team in Comitancillo for everything.

-Trina

Along the journey to one of the communities in the Comitancillo region, rising up at an elevation of 2650 meters.

Along the journey to one of the communities in the Comitancillo region, rising up at an elevation of 2650 meters.

 

One of the passionate farmers whom we interviewed, showing us her criolla (indigenous) bean and maize seed. Ayotes (squash) in the background.

One of the passionate farmers whom we interviewed, showing us her criolla (indigenous) bean and maize seed. Ayotes (squash) in the background.

 

All the colours of the rainbow - indigenous criolla maize seed from one of the farmers in Comitancillo, Guatemala.

All the colours of the rainbow – indigenous criolla maize seed from one of the farmers in Comitancillo, Guatemala.

 

Mother and daughter farmers with their children and grandchildren in Comitancillo, Guatemala.

Mother and daughter farmers with their children and grandchildren in Comitancillo, Guatemala.

 

It was my first time collaborating with a photojournalist to capture stories. Here is the wildly talented and wildly wonderful, KJ Dakin and a few curious children standing by.

It was my first time collaborating with a photojournalist to capture stories. Here is the wildly talented and wildly wonderful, KJ Dakin and a few curious children standing by.

 

One of the farmers demonstrating her weaving projects - weaving a faja (belt) to generate additional income to the household.

One of the farmers demonstrating her weaving projects – weaving a faja (belt) to generate additional income to the household.

 

Sunday was market-day in Comitancillo with farmers from all over the region converging, and transforming the quiet streets to sell their goods. Here are a variety of regional chile peppers and dried fish.

Sunday was market-day in Comitancillo with farmers from all over the region converging, and transforming the quiet streets to sell their goods. Here are a variety of regional chile peppers and dried fish.

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